NY SCBWI 2019

We’re at SCBWI NY Winter 2019. This is my fourth & final blog on this topic. Please also see my guest blog at Wisconsin SCBWI.

Sunday morning we’re back in the main ballroom. Lin Oliver is moderator for a panel of editors and agents. Again, we hear the heart and soul editors and agents put into their work. Their commitment for the writers and illustrators they work with is eye-opening. No matter the genre, they have hopes and dreams as well. They have disappointments, intimidating conference rooms and meetings to get through as well. Each of us is a part of a larger whole. We are encouraged to write because we love to write. Exceedingly few people get rich in the children’s publishing arena. Our definitions of success, our goals and dreams need to be based in reality. We can do this, together!

I wait on tenterhooks for my Sunday morning session. Writing a Series is presented by Matt Ringler, an editor who has many successful book series. Key words for this session are feelings and fresh, delving deep, character development, reality check, and celebrate frequently.

Mr. Ringler leads us through great exercises exploring ourselves, character development, plot, and many other topics. He explores the word success and encourages us to develop our own definition. He helps us understand the process for creating a book series. The people involved, their preparation, sweat, ideas, and tears.

He helps us understand and explore expectation management. It is interesting to hear an example of a small print run of 10,000 books, with a need for a reprint. It can be seen as a huge success! However, if you take the 20,000 that sold as a small print run & reprint. . .if 100,000 were printed but the market fell out and 80-90% are returned, different perspective. There is no magical number=success. It’s all dependent upon the situation.

The “give comparative titles, or not give comp titles” question is answered. Comparative titles are crucial to editors, they need it for their sales pitch to the entire publishing team. (I realize this may vary per publishing house, but this helps my understanding.)

This weekend has been mind blowing, as well as mind opening. Key words for this conference seem to be. . .Perspective. Perceptions. Understanding. Teamwork. Strength and hope (needed from within, and from without). Heart and soul. It takes a village to raise a writer. Perhaps many villages. We can do this. Keep writing!

Bio:

Matt Ringler is a senior editor at Scholastic specializing in chapter book, middle grade, and YA fiction. He works on the Goosebumps series by R.L. Stine, The Puppy Place series by Ellen Miles, and the Two Dogs in a Trench Coat series by Julie Falatko. His YA list include New York Times best-selling author Goldy Moldavsky’s Kill the Boy Band and No Good Deed, plus It’s Not Me, It’s You and The Date to Save by Stephanie Kate Strohm.

Journey Through Workshops

New York 2019 Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators Conference

What do I share about two days of workshops and presentations, when I’ve agreed to the SCBWI policy ‘to not share what isn’t mine to share’?

Wonder and passion are excellent descriptors of my experience in my first session. Title: The Picture Book: It’s Not Writing. It’s Not Illustrating. It’s Riveting Emotional Theater! Presenters: Marla Frazee – illustrator, author and teacher; Allyn Johnston – VP and publisher, Beach Lane Books/Simon and Schuster; Ruben Pfeffer – agent and founder of Rubin Pfeffer Content. We hear how an agent and editor feel when they first read THE script. The script that gives them tingles. The script they read over and over again. The script that stops what they were going to do next. They take care of this first by putting the next steps in motion for THE script.

I hear the awe and respect in their voices as these presenters read picture books that excite them, and that they’ve read over and over, for years. I hear their passion as they point out all that touches them about this book. All that excels and rockets this over most other picture books. This changes my perceptions and perspective, changes my understanding.

I hear the wonder and passion Marla Frazee shares while she discusses her process for a few projects, start to finish. She shares her love and interpretation of the text. She shares the direction and misdirection of her thoughts while sketching thumbnails and larger images. She starts over in one example, to better match the expressiveness and direction of the text.

We hear the passion these people share with the writer. We hear best practices to work as a team. What they share is eye-opening and affirming. We hear the commitment needed from every member involved with a book.

Takeaways I can share, we’ve heard them many times from excellent kidlit people. At the very least, take 8 sheets of paper and fold them in half. 1) Create a picture book dummy for your picture books. 2) Read your book aloud at least 10 times. Why? How many times is a parent, teacher, older sibling or other person going to be reading aloud a favorite picture book? Like many of you, I record most later drafts. When I listen to the recording, I usually find many things to improve. I listen to someone else read it aloud. Hint, I do this with everything I write, no matter the genre.

Commitment, excitement, and exploration describe the afternoon session. Writing for Young Readers: Chapter Books and Young Middle Grade Novels is presented by Alyson Heller, senior editor Aladdin/Simon & Schuster; and Tricia Lin, assistant editor Aladdin/Sime & Schuster. They share examples and definitions of chapter books, young middle grade novels, older novels, and early readers. We hear the commitment and excitement they bring to their work and to the team involved with a book. We hear about the commitment writers need to have for writing, and for creating the end product with a team.

We explore voice, character, and themes in chapter books and mid grade novels. We work with writing prompts that help us find motivations, and develop characters. Writing exercises help us explore a good fit for our talents, tendencies, and skills.

We feel excitement as we brainstorm, work on exercises to explore concepts, and have group discussions. We work in small groups with people from around the country and world, and an editor joins us for a short time. We network and explore ideas. We exchange business cards and say farewell until next time!