Perspective 2019

Perceptions, perspective, and hope guide my life. Participating and attending the 2019 NY SCBWI Conference greatly enriched my internal and external lives. I gained the perspective that far more time is spent in our life NOT having a book release or a book birthday, than having it. If I am in this business for 60 years I may have 378 books written (like Jane Yolen) but most of my writing will have had rejection slips and bumpy journeys to being printed. Some work will be put aside to percolate for a while, or stay silent. Whether author or illustrator, this could be true.

My journey may result in one, or many published books. Exploring bookstores in NYC strengthened my perceptions and perspective. There were entire stores of only children’s books, with shelves up to the ceiling of children’s books, ladders needed to reach them all. No wonder we need to research, and research some more; we need to revise, revise, and revise some more in order to stand out, to create our best work. Then we’ll search & search until we get a great match with an agent and publisher.

No one benefits from a mismatch. No one: no author, agent, editor, nor illustrator takes up a project hoping it fails or never sees the light of day. At 2019 NY SCBWI I listened to agents and editors all weekend share what life in the publishing world is like for them. How their hopes and dreams connected with your book (author and illustrator) flounder or die when others decline it being published. They’ve felt tingles or a spark about this project, they’ve asked difficult questions and committed to at least a year or more of living with this project. But it isn’t to be. AND they have to now tell the agent or illustrator or author, and their entire team that this one didn’t get picked.

We’ve heard of the 100’s and 1000’s of letters that cross agents and editors desks weekly, monthly, annually. No wonder so many more books are written than published, whether self published, traditionally published, or somewhere in between.

May you have a firm foundation for your life. May you explore, see and live so you have perspective and hopes. May your perceptions, preparations, perspiration, and plans be what they need to be for your hopes and dreams to be fulfilled. May you have grace, support, and hope to go on when projects are declined. May you have perspective to listen when you are told your project is good or great, but a mismatch. May you listen with your heart, mind and spirit when suggestions are given that will carry the project along to your vision for it. May you have the strength and energy to explore the suggestions to see what that end result looks and feels like. Then you, the artist, decides if that is your story or you stick with the original work.

Dreams and hopes are fluid. Mismatches happen. Not everything we create is destined for others to see. If your hope falters or deserts you, please reach out and tell someone. Ask for support. To use a friends’ wonderful analogy: sitting on the curb a while is fine. Feel, be, and breathe. Rest a while. If you find yourself slipping into the gutter or being carried down to the sewers, reach out. Others can help. We are a village. It takes a village to raise, nurture, grow, and to support an artist.

Taking Care of Your 80-year old Self

Explore new ideas of fun things. Things you have interest in but perhaps not the time, energy, money, or abilities. Can you adapt them? Volunteer? Maybe apply for a grant or an introductory class? Make a 1-5 year goal? Do a part of something, this year? Or not.

Draw to mind some favorite things you tried as a youngster. Maybe something you only got to do once or a few times. Or dreamed of doing.

Play around, explore. . .Go through puddles or mud (if safe), or whatever comes to mind if the above aren’t doable.

Enjoy something. Hug yourself. Live.

Eighty looks different for each person. Explore, and enjoy!

Want more? Explore, exploring!

Friends often tell me they have a very different perspective 3, 6, or 9 months after retiring, recycling themselves, or re-imagining their lives. Whatever you call it (bodies/minds not cooperating, moving, – everything is included), things look different months down the road.

Some people suggest not committing for at least 6 months after big changes. If you have that luxury, see what opportunities look like later. If you need to commit, perhaps you review things at 6 or 12 months. People get better at exploring, reaching out with their hearts and minds. They cast their nets in new directions, not needing to commit but playing what-if?

So if you haven’t explored for a while, please do so. If your interest, time, energy, money, and abilities all line-up. . .you decide what’s next. More exploring or commitment?

A Dear Friend

George is a dear friend, who happens to be our current oldest friend. He turns 101 in April. He still plays music & sings along while he exercises. We love discussing what he’s reading, which actually means his current book for people who are blind. Every time we get together we discuss and often listen to jazz music (our favorite, if we truly have a favorite type of music).

We frequently discuss older movies, including “A Song is Born” 1948 starring Danny Kaye & Virginia Mayo. If you want to see and hear almost ‘everybody who was somebody’ playing jazz at that time, find “A Song is Born!” (It’s a music themed remake of “Ball of Fire” 1941 starring Barbara Stanwyck & Gary Cooper – also a terrific movie.) That might top our list of favorites, along with Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World. And yes, I may have been born the wrong generation.

Years ago George shared how slowly his tasks got done. Whether it was turning around to sit, or to place something on the counter, everything involved taking many tiny steps and moving his wheeled walker many times. Shortly after our discussion, his legs were less reliable so he started using his wheelchair when he was alone. His very diminished eyesight added more challenges to all tasks. He used an electronic magnifying system for looking at papers and reading. He became a master at orienting and perusing materials when using this disorienting machine.

Nowadays George continues working on thigh & leg strength through sit to stand exercises, while singing. A family member is always present for this activity and they sing along since it helps him keep a good tempo. George uses special equipment with grab bars for these exercises, and he gets strapped to it for safety.

To stand and answer the door is quite a process. Thankfully he has a power lift recliner to start the process. He transfers to the wheelchair, taking several steps for the small standing pivot transfer. He uses a wheelchair at all times since his legs don’t work as well as they did a few years ago. And yes, modifications have been made so expected staff, family and friends can enter without his great effort. We’re greeted with George’s joyful words and smiling face no matter which process is used to open the door.

Celebration and exploration will be common themes in these blogs. Hopefully you glean something from my sharings above. Perhaps you even explore the magnification feature on your computer. Standard installed accommodations for computers have come a long way since I took rehab engineering and technology courses, thank goodness!

If you have the luxury, it can be beneficial and interesting to explore adaptations and accommodations before they’re needed for loved ones or yourself. Exploring changes can also be scary, and frustrating. It can bring up issues people would rather not think about, let alone plan for. Please be compassionate and understanding with yourself around difficult topics.

My hypothesis for “Taking Care of Your 80 year old Self” blog series: I’ve had the honor of teaching approximately 2500 fitness and health classes to people, mostly ages 70 – 94+ years. A vast majority of these classes were with the same folks, twice a week for over 10 years. I’ve learned oodles from these experiences, in addition to working for two and a half decades in health care. I’m looking forward to exploring and sharing perceptions, perspective, and understanding through these blog posts.

Taking Care of Your 80 year-old Self Intro

I’ve had the honor of teaching about 2500 fitness and health classes with people ages 70, 80, and 90+ years. After working for two and a half decades in health care I’ve learned oodles of things. I’m looking forward to celebrating and exploring, to sharing perceptions, perspective, and understanding through these blog posts. The first post starts during the first full week of March.